LESSON 5: Emailing

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BUSINESS SKILLS

LESSON 5: EMAILING


OPENING AND CLOSING AN EMAIL

AIM OF THE LESSON: TO LEARN HOW TO OPEN AND CLOSE AN EMAIL

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Pobierz lekcję w formacie PDF

READING

READ THE TEXT and match the headings with the paragraphs.

NB. Headings:
Only check email at certain times.
Scan for action steps and deadlines.
Send
concise
concise
short / zwięzłe
replies.
Make sure those times aren?t when you are most productive!
Take action immediately
Delete liberally.

I?m now back from Spain and have spent the last week trying to catch up on email, contacts, client relationships, and everything else that I put on hold for my vacation. Getting away was great ? and I made sure not to do any work on the trip ? but coming home to an inbox filled with thousands of messages was not fun.

While I love the instant access to virtually anyone that email provides, that instant access can be a huge drain on my productivity ? especially when 80% of the email I receive is not urgent, doesn?t require a response, or never seems to get to the point.

If you?re struggling to manage your email, here are seven tips to help.

  1. While it?s
    tempting
    tempt
    to make someone want to have or do something, especially something that is unnecessary or wrong / kusić

    to leave your email program open at all times, that?s a huge productivity killer.
    You don?t need to check every email the second it comes in,

    thus
    thus
    in this way, with this result / daltego, zatem, w ten sposób

    interrupting whatever
    task you were doing. Instead,

    set aside
    set aside
    odłożyć na później / reserve for a purpose, save

    20-30 minute blocks of time two or three times per
    day to check email. If this type of non-responsiveness makes you nervous, create an
    autoresponder that states the specific times you check email, when the sender
    can expect a response, and what to do if they have an urgent need.

  2. While it?s tempting to check your email first thing in the morning,
    this isn?t always the most productive. Instead, Brian Tracy suggests in his book, Eat That Frog,
    that you should look over your to-do list and find the biggest task that will

    yield
    yield
    to supply or produce something positive such as a profit, an amount of food or information / przynieść, dostarczyć

    the most positive benefits if you complete it now ? and do that first thing in the morning rather than start off the day with email. Your email can wait. Use your most productive times to work on the stuff that matters most.
  3. You can delete a considerable portion of your email before you even open it just by checking out the sender and subject. Scan both, and then ask yourself ?Do I really have to read this today?? If the answer is no, hit delete. Don?t keep it around in hopes of reading it later ? it will probably just sit in your inbox unopened.
  4. Much of the email we receive can be classified as junk mail or notifications and doesn?t require action on our part. Look for email that does require a specific action that must be done within the next week or two and set these email aside. These should be your top priority.
  5. If the email requires you to take action and you can do that action in
    less than two minutes, do it now rather than

    putting it off
    put off
    to decide or arrange to delay an event or activity until a later time or date / odłożyć, odwlec w czasie

    . It?s better to get things done quickly than to put them off until you prioritize everything. For action steps that will take longer, move the email to a prioritized folder so you can easily find it along with all the other action-oriented emails. Searching for buried email lost in a sea of unimportant email is a huge time waster.

  6. When you respond, keep it as short and to-the-point as possible. Start off by summarizing the key point you are responding to and add your reply, so your recipients understand your response in context. For instance: ?You asked if I can attend a meeting on Monday, June 16 at 3PM. Unfortunately, I?m not available until 4PM. If that doesn?t work for you, I can also meet Tuesday morning.? You don?t need to write a book here. Limit yourself to a few sentences at most ? or better yet, if you can answer the question in the subject line, do so.

Time is your greatest asset, and learning to manage your email effectively can really give your productivity a boost.

Click here, to see the key!

  1. Only check email at certain times. While it?s tempting to leave your email program open at all times, that?s a huge productivity killer. You don?t need to check every email the second it comes in, thus interrupting whatever task you were doing. Instead, set aside 20-30 minute blocks of time two or three times per day to check email. If this type of non-responsiveness makes you nervous, create an autoresponder that states the specific times you check email, when the sender can expect a response, and what to do if they have an urgent need.
  2. Make sure those times aren?t when you are most productive! While it?s tempting to check your email first thing in the morning, this isn?t always the most productive. Instead, Brian Tracy suggests in his book, Eat That Frog, that you should look over your to-do list and find the biggest task that will yield the most positive benefits if you complete it now ? and do that first thing in the morning rather than start off the day with email. Your email can wait. Use your most productive times to work on the stuff that matters most.
  3. Delete liberally. You can delete a considerable portion of your email before you even open it just by checking out the sender and subject. Scan both, and then ask yourself ?Do I really have to read this today?? If the answer is no, hit delete. Don?t keep it around in hopes of reading it later ? it will probably just sit in your inbox unopened.
  4. Scan for action steps and deadlines. Much of the email we receive can be classified as junk mail or notifications and doesn?t require action on our part. Look for email that does require a specific action that must be done within the next week or two and set these email aside. These should be your top priority.
  5. Take action immediately. If the email requires you to take action and you can do that action in less than two minutes, do it now rather than putting it off. It?s better to get things done quickly than to put them off until you prioritize everything. For action steps that will take longer, move the email to a prioritized folder so you can easily find it along with all the other action-oriented emails. Searching for buried email lost in a sea of unimportant email is a huge time waster.
  6. Send concise replies. When you respond, keep it as short and to-the-point as possible. Start off by summarizing the key point you are responding to and add your reply, so your recipients understand your response in context. For instance: ?You asked if I can attend a meeting on Monday, June 16 at 3PM. Unfortunately, I?m not available until 4PM. If that doesn?t work for you, I can also meet Tuesday morning.? You don?t need to write a book here. Limit yourself to a few sentences at most ? or better yet, if you can answer the question in the subject line, do so.

Time is your greatest asset, and learning to manage your email effectively can really give your productivity a boost.

Source: http://www.realtybizcoach.com/2008/06/13/7-tips-for-coping-with-email-overload/

NOW ANSWER THE QUESTIONS BELOW.

  1. How often during your work day do you check your mail box? Do you follow the rule mentioned in 1st paragraph or do you check your emails every time they come in?
  2. What is the most productive time of the day for you? Do you check your mail box then?
  3. Do you follow the rule mentioned in paragraph 3? If not, why?
  4. Do you often put off answering emails that should be actioned immediately?
  5. How concise are your email replies?
  6. Do you find the rules described in the text useful or not? If yes, why? / If not, why?

Now – once you know how to deal with your emails, let’s see if you know how to write a formal email.

WARM UP – Decide which phrases are formal, neutral or informal. Put a tick in a proper column.

Phrases: FORMAL NEUTRAL INFORMAL
Dear Mr / Mrs / Ms Smith
Dear Sarah
Hello
Hi John
Best regards
I am looking forward to hearing from you
Yours sincerely
Bye
All the best
Look forward to seeing you
Bye for now
Give my regards to
Regards
Warm (-est) regards
Click here, to see the key!

Phrases: FORMAL NEUTRAL INFORMAL
Dear Mr / Mrs / Ms Smith
Dear Sarah
Hello
Hi John
Best regards
I am looking forward to hearing from you
Yours sincerely
Bye
All the best
Look forward to seeing you
Bye for now
Give my regards to
Regards
Warm (-est) regards

EXERCISE 1 ? USEFUL PHRASES

Order the phrases into a proper column. Put a tick in a proper column.

Phrases: OPENING AN EMAIL CLOSING AN EMAIL REFERING TO PREVIOUS CONTACT
Dear Sir or Madam
In reply to your last email
I am looking forward to hearing from you
Best regards
Yours sincerely
Regards
Thank you for your help
With reference to your last email
With reference to your email sent
Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any further questions
Please let me know if you need any further information
Kind regards
Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions
Thank you for your email of …
Further to your last email
Dear Mr Clark,
If you require any further assistance, please contact me on
Click here, to see the key!

Phrases: OPENING AN EMAIL CLOSING AN EMAIL REFERING TO PREVIOUS CONTACT
Dear Sir or Madam
In reply to your last email
I am looking forward to hearing from you
Best regards
Yours sincerely
Regards
Thank you for your help
With reference to your last email
With reference to your email sent
Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any further questions
Please let me know if you need any further information
Kind regards
Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions
Thank you for your email of …
Further to your last email
Dear Mr Clark,
If you require any further assistance, please contact me on

EXERCISE 2 ? USEFUL PHRASES

Match the beginnings with the endings.

BEGINNINGS ENDINGS
1. Dear Mr Turner,
in reply to your email regarding your application, I am sorry to inform you …

A. Please let me know if the payment is on your account.
Yours sincerely,
Tom Blake

2. Dear Susan,
thank you for your email of 3rd May. We apologize for the delay in our payment.

B. If you have any furher questions, please feel free to contact me.
Best regards,
Margaret Wilson

3. Dear Mrs White,
thank you for your request. I am pleased to send you more detailed information on our product.

C. Thank you in advance for your help.
Regards, Jeff

4. Dear Robert,
I can’t log on to our system…

D. Thank you for applying …

Click here, to see the key!

1 D / 2 A / 3 B / 4 C

EXERCISE 3 ? USEFUL PHRASES

Read the subjects of the emails and write an opening for each email.

Email number 1 ? subject: Request for proposal – answer

Click here, to see the key!
Suggested answer

Dear Ms Higgins,
thank you for your RFP. In reply to your email I am sending our proposal.

Email number 2 ? subject: Late delivery – answer

Click here, to see the key!
Suggested answer

Dear Mr Dickens,
with the reference to your last email regarding our late delivery, we would like to apologize for …

Email number 3 ? subject: A complaint – answer

Click here, to see the key!
Suggested answer

Dear Mrs Duberville,
thank you for your email. We appreciate your comments on our product.

Email number 4 ? subject: Request for more information

Click here, to see the key!
Suggested answer

Dear Helen,
thank you for your email. I will be more than happy to provide you with more detailed information (about our long term plans / etc.)

EXERCSE 4 ? USEFUL PHRASES

Rewrite the sentences and put the words in the correct order.

  1. I / as / possible / as / this / information / look / forward / receiving /to / soon
  2. Should / any / further / about / products, / our / you / need / information / we / to / assist / will / happy / be / more than / you
  3. I / email / writing / regard / to / am / with / your / recent
  4. Please / hesitate / to / contact / don’t / us, / any / further / in case / questions / of
  5. Please / free / me, / contact / feel / to / if / need / further / you / assistance
  6. Thank / your / email / on / 7th July / sent / on / you / for
  7. With / to / last / reference / your / email. / I am / to provide / writing / you / more / with / information.
Click here, to see the key!

  1. I look forward to receiving this information as soon as possible.
  2. Should you need any further information about our products, we will be happy to assistt you.
  3. I am writing with regard to your recent email.
  4. Please don’t hesitate to contact us, in case of any further questions.
  5. Please feel free to contact me, if you need further assistance.
  6. Thank you for your email sent on 7th July.
  7. With reference to your last email, I am writing to provide you with more information.