LESSON 7: Record Keeping of Personal Data

LESSON 7

RECORD KEEPING OF PERSONAL DATA

In this lesson you will learn vocabulary related to the topic of record keeping of personal data.

 

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Pobierz lekcję w formacie PDF

 


Revision from the last lesson:

Revise your presentation skills:

Use the slides below to make your presentation.

TOPIC OF THE PRESENTATION: AGEISM

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What Is Ageism?

Ageism is a term that was coined in the 20th Century to refer to discrimination related to age.

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Why Is Ageism Bad?

Ageism makes assumptions about individuals, their abilities, their circumstances, their preferences and much more, simply because of one factor – in this case, their ages.

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Is Ageism Against the Law?

Yes. The Employment Equality Act (Age) Regulations 2006 protects people aged 50 and over from being discriminated against in the areas of employment and education.

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What Are Other Kinds of Ageism?

ageism in consumer and healthcare venues

examples:

  • if an individual is denied credit or insurance because of his or her age,
  • if an individual experiences a lower level of service because of his or her age,
  • if an individual experiences a lower level of healthcare because of his or her age (such as not being referred to a consultant) then ageism may be present.
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How Is Ageism Being Fought and How Can I Fight Ageism?

  • legislation such as the Employment Equality Act (Age) Regulations 2006.
  • Get to know older (and younger) people in your community,
  • cease making jokes or pointed references to age and ability, tell others that such jokes and references are unacceptable
  • do all that you can to learn from the talents of each individual, regardless of age.
  • Work with groups connected to fighting ageism, such as through fundraising or publicity, can also be worthwhile.

 

The text below will help you to make the presentation.

 

„Ageism” is a term that was coined in the 20th Century to refer to discrimination related to age. Usually ageism refers to discrimination against older members of society, though if a young person is discriminated against (s)he may also be to successfully claim that (s)he was denied his or her rights due to ageism. Unlike other forms of discrimination, ageism is often frequently unnoticed in the United Kingdom.

What Is Ageism?

Ageism is the stereotyping of, prejudice against or discrimination against an individual due to his or her age. Usually this refers to older people, those aged 50 years or older, though it can also related to young professionals, teens and even children.

Why Is Ageism Bad?

Like all forms of discrimination, ageism makes assumptions about individuals, their abilities, their circumstances, their preferences and much more, simply because of one factor – in this case, their ages. This is neither fair nor just and a variety of organisations and individuals are working hard towards highlighting and eradicating ageism in the United Kingdom.

Is Ageism Against the Law?

Yes. The Employment Equality Act (Age) Regulations 2006 protects people aged 50 and over from being discriminated against in the areas of employment and education. These Regulations discuss age equality in the hiring of new workers, how workers are treated in the workplace, and age equality in firing, redundancies and retirement (as well as the educational equivalents). Employment equality for younger workers is dealt with in other legislation, and educational concerns regarding young people are often dealt with on a case by case basis at particular educational institutions.

What Are Other Kinds of Ageism?

Aside from ageism that can be present in employment and education, ageism can also exist in consumer and healthcare venues (among other arenas). For example, if an individual is denied credit or insurance because of his or her age, if an individual experiences a lower level of service because of his or her age, or if an individual experiences a lower level of healthcare because of his or her age (such as not being referred to a consultant) then ageism may be present.

How Is Ageism Being Fought?

In the government ageism is being fought with legislation such as the Employment Equality Act (Age) Regulations 2006. On the organisational level groups such as Age Concern (www.ageconcern.org.uk) agitate for age equality. On a more personal level, every time an individual reconsiders a stereotype of an older (or younger) person and/or speaks out against discrimination based on age then ageism is being fought.

How Can I Fight Ageism?

You needn’t attend rallies or petition the government to fight ageism, in fact much more subtler means can get your point across just as well. Get to know older (and younger) people in your community, cease making jokes or pointed references to age and ability, tell others that such jokes and references are unacceptable and do all that you can to learn from the talents of each individual, regardless of age. Working with groups connected to fighting ageism, such as through fundraising or publicity, can also be worthwhile.

 


 

LESSON 7

RECORD KEEPING OF PERSONAL DATA

 

READING ACTIVITY

Exercise 1 – reading

THINK: HOW IMPORTANT IS GOOD KEEPING OF PERSONAL DATA AND WHY?

 

Read the two first paragraphs of the text below. Answer these questions:

  1. What is the link between planning and keeping accurate personnel records?
  2. How can good records help managers?

 

Why personnel records are important?

Paragraph 1
Planning ahead can help all organisations to remain competitive and provide good service to their customers. Planning often depends on having

accurate
accurate
correct, exact and without any mistakes / poprawny, precyzyjny, dokładny
, up-to-date information. Personnel records are particularly important when it comes to getting the best out of your employees. Effective recruitment, training and staff development
play a key part
play a key part
be essentially important / odgrywać kluczową rolę
in achieving organizational goals.

Paragraph 2
Good records can help managers:

  • make decisions based on fact rather than guesswork,
  • know what staff resources are available to meet production / service requirements,
  • more accurately assess levels of performance and productivity,
  • know what is happening with absence levels, employee turnover, sickness, accidents, lateness, discipline etc, and take
    appropriate
    appropriate
    suitable or right for a particular situation or occasion / właściwy, odpowiedni, słuszny
    and timely action.

Now read the remaining paragraphs.
Make one question to each paragraph.

Paragraph 3
Personnel records are necessary for the formulation and implementation of employment policies and procedures for recruitment, training, promotion, dismissal, etc. Some of these are required by law and others enable personnel to monitor other processes. For instance, personnel records, and the statistics they provide, are important in helping to develop policies free from any

bias
bias
often supporting or opposing a particular person or thing in an unfair way by allowing personal opinions to influence your judgment / uprzedzenie, stronniczość
on grounds of
on grounds of
because of a reason, cause or argument / ze względu na
sex, sexual orientation, religion or belief, race, age or disability.

Paragraph 4
Accurate records help ensure that workers receive their correct pay, holidays, pension and other

entitlements
entitlements
something that you have right to do or have / prawo do czegoś
and benefits. They can be used to monitor fair and consistent
treatment
treatment
traktowanie
of staff, for example in relation to promotion and discipline, and for worker development purposes. Many national published statistics, for instance on earnings, employee turnover, overtime and so on, are gathered from employers via such records. Employers? associations, individual organisations, trade unions and many other bodies use such information to help formulate their own strategies and policies. Good record keeping helps organizations to respond
readily
readily
quickly, immediately, willingly or without any problem / chętnie, z łatwością / ochoczo
to requests for this type of information, subject to the
constraints
constraint
something which controls what you do by keeping you within particular limits / ograniczenie, przymus
of the Data Protection Act 1998 and individual anonymity within the statistics.

Paragraph 5
Care must be taken over access to personnel records, as described more fully in the Data Protection Act 1998. The Information Commissioner?s Codes of Practice give guidance on how to

comply with
comply with
to act according to an order, set of rules or request / dostosować się
the Act and the Code dealing with employment records is particularly useful in helping employers to
distinguish
distinguish
to notice or understand the difference between two things / rozróżnić
between absence and sickness records.

Click here, to see the key!
Suggested answers:
Paragraph 3
What are personnel records necessary for?

Paragraph 4
What can accurate records be used for?

Paragraph 5
What is fully described in the Data Protection Act 1998?


EXERCISE 2 – vocabulary exercise

BUILD YOUR OWN SENTENCES WITH THE HIGHLIGHTED WORDS.

EXERCISE 3 – vocabulary and reading comprehension exercise.

Order the main areas for record keeping to a proper box. Decide which areas are

statutory
statutory
decided or controlled by law / statutowy, ustawowy
and which organizational ones.

  1. Discipline
    discipline procedures
    procedury dyscyplinarne
    , including
    dismissals
    dismissals
    zwolnienie
    , and
    grievance
    grievance
    skarga, zażalenie
    .
  2. Training and career development for individuals.
  3. tax and national insurance
    Tax and national insurance
    podatek i National Insurance NumberNational Insurance Number
    A national identification number or National Identity Card number is used by the governments of many countries as a means of tracking their citizens, permanent residents, and temporary residents for the purposes of work, taxation, government benefits, health care, and other governmentally-related functions (UK).
    .
  4. Pay
    pay
    płace, wynagrodzenie
    .
  5. Induction
    induction
    wdrożenie
    .
  6. Paid sickness
    paid sickness
    (sick pay, paid sick days, sick leave) ? wynagrodzenie chorobowe
    .
  7. Individual hours worked.
  8. Accidents
    accidents
    wypadek przy pracy / wypadek
    ,
    injuries
    injuries
    urazy, uszkodzenia (ciała)
    ,
    diseases
    disease
    choroba
    and
    dangerous occurrences
    dangerous occurrences
    niebezpieczne zdarzenie
    .
  9. Recruitment and selection procedures and results.
  10. Holidays
    Holidays
    wakacje
    .
  11. Termination of employment
    Termination of employment
    wypowiedzenie umowy
    .
  12. Sick pay/sick absence
    Sick pay/sick absence
    nieobecność w pracy z powodu choroby
    .
  13. Other absence,
    lateness
    lateness
    spóźnienia (do pracy)
    and
    employee turnover
    employee turnover
    rotacja pracowników
    .
  14. Equal opportunities
    equal opportunity
    równe szanse
    issues (gender, sexual orientation, religion or belief, race, age, disabilities).

 

STATUTORY RECORDS
This section covers the main areas that anyone dealing with personnel matters will need for record keeping because they are required by law.
ORGANISATIONAL RECORDS
In addition to these statutory requirements, the organisation will want to keep other records.












 

Click here, to see the key!

STATUTORY RECORDS
This section covers the main areas that anyone dealing with personnel matters will need for record keeping because they are required by law.
ORGANISATIONAL RECORDS
In addition to these statutory requirements, the organisation will want to keep other records.
  • tax and national insurance,
  • individual hours worked,
  • holidays,
  • pay,
  • paid sickness
  • accidents, injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences
  • recruitment and selection procedures and results,
  • induction,
  • training and career development for individuals,
  • sick pay/sick absence,
  • other absence, lateness and employee turnover
  • discipline, including dismissals, and grievance
  • termination of employment
  • equal opportunities issues (gender, sexual orientation, religion or belief, race, age, disabilities).

 

Exercise 4 – Vocabulary exercise.

Complete the sentences with the following words:

 

paid holiday employee turnover equal opportunity ‚dangerous occurrence’
Sick Pay employee turnover work-related accidents termination
grievances lateness

 

1. You also may want to approach the human resource manager and mention that is becoming a problem in general.

2. The state system of sickness payments known as Statutory (SSP) requires employers to make sickness payments for up to 28 weeks of sickness.

3. are concerns, problems or complaints that employees raise with their employer.

4.If something happens which does not result in a reportable injury, but which clearly could have done, then it may be a ‚‚ which must be reported immediately. They may include events such as:

  • failure of a load-bearing part of a crane
  • sudden release of materials from a pressurised system or pipework
  • some kinds of fire and explosions
  • collapse of part of a building

5.Most workers have the right to take a minimum amount of . This is called statutory holidays.

6. A contract of employment may be ended by mutual agreement or by the employer or employee giving the required notice of .

7. Your employer must report serious , diseases and dangerous incidents to the Incident Contact Centre of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

8. There is no set level of that determines at what point turnover starts to have a negative impact on an organisation?s performance.

9. policy is that in the recruitment, selection, education and assessment of students, and in the recruitment, selection, training, appraisal, development and promotion of staff, the only consideration must be that the individual meets, or is likely to meet the requirements of the programme or course or post.

 

Click here, to see the key!

1. You also may want to approach the human resource manager and mention that lateness is becoming a problem in general.

2. The state system of sickness payments known as Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) requires employers to make sickness payments for up to 28 weeks of sickness.

3. Grievances are concerns, problems or complaints that employees raise with their employer.

4.If something happens which does not result in a reportable injury, but which clearly could have done, then it may be a ‚dangerous occurrence‚ which must be reported immediately. They may include events such as:

  • failure of a load-bearing part of a crane
  • sudden release of materials from a pressurised system or pipework
  • some kinds of fire and explosions
  • collapse of part of a building

5.Most workers have the right to take a minimum amount of paid holiday. This is called statutory holidays.

6. A contract of employment may be ended by mutual agreement or by the employer or employee giving the required notice of termination.

7. Your employer must report serious work-related accidents, diseases and dangerous incidents to the Incident Contact Centre of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

8. There is no set level of employee turnover that determines at what point turnover starts to have a negative impact on an organisation?s performance.

9. Equal opportunity policy is that in the recruitment, selection, education and assessment of students, and in the recruitment, selection, training, appraisal, development and promotion of staff, the only consideration must be that the individual meets, or is likely to meet the requirements of the programme or course or post.